HALT COLLECTION OF VIEWS

Duale wants BBI to recommend a parliamentary system

In Summary

• Duale says the current system is to blame for recurring post-election violence and negative ethnicity

• Ijara MP says they would support a pure parliamentary system in the event a referendum is held

National Assembly Majority leader Aden Duale, Mohamed Dahiye of Dadaab and Sophia Abdi of Ijara in Qone, Balambala constituency, on Sunday
CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE: National Assembly Majority leader Aden Duale, Mohamed Dahiye of Dadaab and Sophia Abdi of Ijara in Qone, Balambala constituency, on Sunday
Image: /STEPHEN ASTARIKO

National Assembly Majority leader Aden Duale on Sunday urged the Building Bridges Initiative to recommend a pure parliamentary system of government.

He also wants the collection of views from Kenyans suspended.

The BBI has been going around the country collecting views from Kenyans on how best the country should be governed.

 

Speaking in Qone, Balamabla constituency, during a fundraiser in aid of local Islamic institutions, Duale said they will rally behind residents of the region to support the parliamentary system.

He said the current system is to blame for recurring post-election violence and negative ethnicity.

“Every five years we go to the election and immediately after we cast our votes, the fear of clashes becomes evident. We start fighting over disputed results. The end result is not always good,” Duale said.

 A parliamentary system will cure all these problems, the MP said.

“As leaders from the pastoralist community, we are urging the BBI team led by Senator Yussuf Haji that they stop wasting time and resources collecting views and instead propose a referendum to help the country adopt a parliamentary system of government,” Duale said.

He was accompanied by Dadaab MP Mohamed Dahiye, Sophia Abdi of Ijara, Nasra Mohamed (nominated) and Woman Representative Anab Gure.

Ijara MP said they would support a pure parliamentary system in the event a referendum is held.

 

“We want an inclusive government where every Kenyan will feel equally represented irrespective of where he or she comes from. It is only through the system that Kenyans from all tribes, including those from pastoral and minority groups, will get representation," Abdi said.

Dahiye MP said the parliamentary system is the only cure for post-election violence.

"We will support the president and the deputy president. But we will also support a parliamentary system because we believe it is the best for everybody. It will address all the gaps in the current constitution," he said.

In a parliamentary system, the head of state is usually a person distinct from the head of government.

This is in contrast to a presidential system, where the head of state is also the head of government and, most importantly, the Executive does not derive its democratic legitimacy from the Legislature.