IMMUNITY BOOST

Bones may overtake lemons as the new Covid-19 cash cow

Although bone soup does not heal or prevent Covid-19, sales are an all time high in Meru

In Summary

•Daniel Kimaita, head of the Meru county reproductive health services, told the Star bone soup is rich in irons, and other minerals that boost immunity.

•He said bone marrow soup does not heal or prevent Covid-19, but only boosts immunity.

Beef bones, disliked for tipping the weighing scale, are now overtaking the tenderloin steak in sales.

Thanks to Covid-19 and a growing conviction in the healing benefits of bone soup, butchers in Meru are unable to satisfy the demands of their customers.

Bones are sought after for their marrow, used to make a savoury, nutrient-dense, and collagen-rich broth. 

Daniel Kimaita, head of the Meru county reproductive health services, told the Star bone soup is rich in irons, and other minerals that boost immunity.

He said it is not surprising that people are turning to bone soup when the country is fighting Covid-19.

However, he clarified bones or the soup, do not heal or prevent Covid-19, but only boost immunity.

Sales of lemons and gingers also went up during the Covid-19 lockdown.

Mithika Mutuma, owner of Good Morning Butchery in Meru town, said sale of steak (commonly referring to the boneless slab) has gone down.

He sells a kilo of liver at Sh450, Matumbo at Sh250 while bones sell at Sh450 and a kilo of beef at Sh700.

Kimaita says bone marrow soup is good for a pregnant woman or lactating mothers because it helps rebuilding of tendons, ligaments and skin after labour.

He says bone broth contains the healing benefits of collagen, elastin, gelatin and hyaluronic acid to help nourish and strengthen joints.

It also helps in minerals and detoxification.

Mutuma said most of his customers are elderly and women who have delivered recently.

“Bones are at a high demand nowadays than before coronavirus struck. I have received some patients directed here by doctors who tell them to buy bones for bone marrow soup,” he said.

Mutuma said many of his customers are doctors from Meru who also refer some patients to buy bones at his butchery.

Mutuma said many businesses collapsed after the announcement of the first coronavirus case in Kenya.