HYPOCRITES?

BBI opponents should not vie after referendum, says Wa Iria

Some leaders have said the funds set aside for the referendum process should be channelled towards development projects

In Summary

• The governor said leaders fighting it should not seek elective positions after the referendum.

• He said most leaders fighting the BBI are only seeking political mileage.

 

Governor Mwangi wa Iria on BBI last month.
Governor Mwangi wa Iria on BBI last month.
Image: ALICE WAITHERA

Murang’a Governor Mwangi wa Iria has said opponents of the BBI should shelve their political ambitions should the Constitution of Kenya (Amendment) Bill, 2020 pass.

The governor said leaders fighting it should not seek elective positions after the referendum.

The governor said it would be hypocritical for leaders who do not want more funds channelled to the grassroots to ask for Kenyans’ votes for positions that will put them in control of the same funds.

Some leaders have said the funds set aside for the referendum process should be channelled towards development projects, and that the constitutional changes will be too expensive to implement.

Speaking at Murang’a Social Hall on Thursday during a public participation forum for the BBI, the governor said most of the opponents of the bill are only seeking political mileage while disregarding the benefits that would be accrued from its passage.

The governor said the county will receive about Sh6 billion more, bringing the total county allocation to about Sh12 billion annually.

“Those claiming that the constitutional reviews will burden Kenyans because of the extra positions created should know that some current positions will be scrapped,” he said.

Wa Iria said the one man, one vote, one shilling resources allocation formula will ensure constituencies are funded depending on their population. 

He said once Kenyans are fully sensitised on the bill, they will be able to make their independent choices.

 Wa Iria said President Uhuru Kenyatta has the interest of Mt Kenya region at heart and should receive unwavering support.

Magochi Murathi, a Murang’a town resident, urged leaders not to mislead Kenyans on the bill.

“Those who are against the bill are yet to come to us with alternatives on how more funds can be devolved to the grassroots,” he added.

He said the bill proposes stern measures of curbing graft, alluding that some of those against it are afraid of being held accountable.