EXTRA CONSTITUENCY, MORE FUNDS

Support BBI to benefit, Murang'a residents urged

Two constituencies that are protected will be saved if the Constitution of Kenya Amendment Bill passes

In Summary

• Mathioya and Kangema are some of the 27 constituencies countrywide that are protected by the current Constitution after failing to achieve the required population threshold of between 120,000 and 140,000 people.

• The constituencies were given 10 years to increase their population, failing which they would be abolished.

Former Kangema MP Tirus Ngahu in a previous function.
Former Kangema MP Tirus Ngahu in a previous function.
Image: Alice Waithera

Former Kangema MP Tirus Ngahu has asked Murang’a residents to support the Building Bridges Initiative to get an extra constituency and more funds.

Ngahu said two constituencies that are protected will be saved if the Constitution of Kenya Amendment Bill passes, while Kiharu constituencies, the largest in the county, will be subdivided.

Mathioya and Kangema are some of the 27 constituencies countrywide that are protected by the current constitution after failing to achieve the required population threshold of between 120,000 and 140,000 people.

Kiharu on the other hand has far exceeded the threshold with a population of about 200,000 people.

“Under the current Constitution, parts of Kiharu will be hived off and added to Kangema and Mathioya to balance off the population discrepancies which would in turn disadvantage the two constituencies as they would not receive extra funds‚” Ngahu said.

Originally, Murang’a county had four constituencies that included Kandara, Kigumo, Kiharu and Kangema. Gatanga was eventually hived off Kandara, Maragua from Kigumo and Mathioya from Kangema while Kiharu was left as it was.

“Kiharu people continue to be disadvantaged due to their high numbers and limited resources. Sometimes, you even pity their MP because he has to work harder with similar funds as other constituencies,” Ngahu said.

Ngahu who served Kangema since the late John Michuki passed away in 2012 to 2017 said the bill seeks to address the issues that were left unaddressed in the current constitution.

He said the bill further seals most loopholes through which public funds seep.

The government,  he said, has been using huge amounts of funds to restore calm after every election, a problem that will be resolved through the constitutional review.

“With the proposed set up, a presidential candidate will need to work together with several communities to clinch the seat which will remove the animosity experienced after elections,” he said.

It will also see Cabinet secretaries sourced from the National Assembly, making them more independent as compared to the current ones who are fully submissive to the appointing authority.

“If a CS is sacked right now, they are rendered jobless but if they were MPs then they would still have a platform to continue working for Kenyans,” Ngahu said.

In an open reference to area Senator Irungu Kang’ata, who is also the Senate chief whip, Ngahu said all handshake leaders should sensitise Kenyans on the bill instead of complaining that it is not being embraced.

 

Edited by Kiilu Damaris