CLOSURE OF BARS

Don't brew alcohol at home, Murang'a residents warned

Punitive measures will be taken against those found brewing or consuming illicit alcohol

In Summary

• Barre said some people were making their own liquor following the closure of bars.

• Said come bars are said to be secretly admitting patrons and selling liquor to them while their doors remain locked.

Murang'a county commissioner Mohamed Barre and Governor Mwangi wa Iria
PREVENTING THE SPREAD: Murang'a county commissioner Mohamed Barre and Governor Mwangi wa Iria
Image: /Alice Waithera

Murang'a residents have been warned against brewing alcohol now that bars have been shut to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

County commissioner Mohamed Barre said heightened punitive measures will be taken against those found brewing or consuming illicit alcohol.

Speaking in his office on Tuesday, he said some people may be tempted to start brewing and consuming brews as many relocate from urban to rural areas due to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

Barre said the government’s directive to stay at home will be strictly enforced and bar owners who will be found operating will face the full force of the law.

He urged residents to buy alcoholic drinks from supermarkets and wine shops and consume them in their homes.

Some bars are said to be secretly admitting patrons and selling liquor to them behind closed doors.

“We will take punitive action against those found violating the government’s directives,” he said.

Last week, Governor Mwangi wa Iria revoked all bars' licenses after operators failed to heed calls to close down as directed by the county emergency response team.

The governor said congestion and poor hygiene in bars would aid the spread of the virus and inebriated people would not be able to protect themselves. 

Meanwhile, Barre said most mourners still do not adhere to the directive that only 15 people should attend burial ceremonies.

 
 

He said administrators had been forced to disperse mourners in several instances to ensure there was no crowding.

He appealed to religious leaders to help the government enforce the directive by explaining to mourners the need to shun such events. “They just need a few youths to help dig the grave and a few family members,” he said.

Barre also cautioned roadside hawkers against scrambling for buyers. He said travellers will have to park their vehicles, alight and wash their hands before buying anything. “We will not allow hawkers to sell their wares through vehicles’ windows like they normally do,” he said.

The commissioner further urged parents to keep their children away from playgrounds. He said allowing children to come together to play puts them at risk. All swimming pools are to be closed to the public.

“We are asking parents to assist us by keeping their children indoors,” he said.

The county government is also fumigating shopping centres and markets to protect residents from the virus.

Edited by A. Ndung'u