HEALTH

Upgrade Ruiru hospital to Level 5, MP urges state

In Summary

• The MP wants the hospital upgraded, more equipment installed and more medical staff hired to offer quality services.

• King'ara also urged the national government to make cancer screening and treatment free, saying that the disease has become a burden to most poor Kenyans.

Ruiru MP Simon King'ara with medics during the free medical camp in Kahawa Wendani on Friday
HEALTH: Ruiru MP Simon King'ara with medics during the free medical camp in Kahawa Wendani on Friday
Image: /John Kamau

Ruiru MP Simon King’ara has urged the government to upgrade Ruiru Level 4 Hospital to a Level 5 facility.

He said the level 4 hospital is heavily congested as it serves 600,000 residents and services at the facility are overstretched.

Some patients, especially those seeking X-ray services, have to be referred to Thika level 5 Hospital.

The MP said the facility should be expanded and allocated more personnel and equipment to offer effective medical care in Ruiru and beyond.

He spoke on Friday during a free medical camp organised by the Ng’ang’a King’ara Foundation in Kahawa Wendani.

“The upgrading will be a big relief for residents, many of whom cannot afford treatment in private hospitals,” King’ara said.

The lawmaker said that for decades patients have been referred to Thika Level 5 Hospital and Kenyatta National Hospital for specialised treatment.

“It’s high time the government considers upgrading Ruiru hospital so that it can receive more funding to serve the high population in Ruiru subcounty and its environs,” King’ara said.

He also said the facility is seriously understaffed and urged both the national and county governments to address the matter with urgency.

King'ara also urged the national government to make cancer screening and treatment free, saying that the disease has become a burden to most poor Kenyans.

The MP said that a high percentage of Kenyans are suffering from cancer in silence because they lack resources to cater for the expensive treatment and management.

King’ara said most Kenyans who come from humble backgrounds fail to go for cancer screening because they fear it might become a burden to their families should they test positive.

“Like today, we have detected three cases during this medical camp and after interrogating the patients, they’ve disclosed that they cannot afford treatment. We will assist them to get proper treatment and medication,” he said.

More than 1,500 residents benefited from the free medical camp that was organised in partnership with Good News Volunteers.