CURRENTLY AT 20%

Kirinyaga in drive to attain 30 per cent forest cover

In Summary

• This rainy season alone some 1.5 million seedlings have been distributed across the county and planted within in homesteads and public institutions.

• Monica Masivo spoke in Kerugoya where she led residents in the ongoing tree planting exercise which will continue until the ongoing rains subside. 

Ngong Hills Forest
Ngong Hills Forest
Image: COURTESY

Kirinyaga is gearing up to attain a 30 per cent forest cover from its current 20 per cent, area ecosystem conservator has said.

Monica Masivo said this rainy season alone some 1.5 million seedlings have been distributed across the county and planted within in homesteads and public institutions. He, however, said Kirinyaga still lags behind Nyeri, which has attained 28 per cent and leading in the Central region.

“When the long rains come in March next year. We are again set to distribute an additional 3.5 million seedlings in an effort to realise the United Nation’s forest cover requirement,” she said.

Masivo spoke in Kerugoya where she led residents in the ongoing tree planting exercise which will continue until the ongoing rains subside. She said enough trees are available for schools and farmers. Masibo said they will focus on Mwea.

“We’ve earmarked Murinduko hill in Mwea East where we’ll be planting over one million indigenous tree seedlings and reclaim all its bare area."

Also targeted is the South Ngariama Ranching scheme where all the trees were destroyed after about 6,000 landless people were settled.

“Although some of these settlers have planted some few trees, there is an urgent need for a massive reafforestation campaign in the area, especially on vast spaces set aside for public utility,” she said.

Most parts of Mwea are in dire need of tree planting due to to their dry nature, she added. Logging remains banned and residents have lauded the government for extending the move.

The county government wants a permanent ban put in place in this natural forest. Cost of timber has gone up following the ban, with some farmers resorting to the harvesting of premature trees.

(Edited by F'Orieny)