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RISING TEEN PREGNANCIES

Advise daughters on sex, Kiambu parents told

County officials say girls are lured by rich men who buy them gifts, leading to dropping out of school

In Summary

• Officials say advice offered by teachers is not enough

• They say students are allowed out at night and sometimes arrested

Limuru senior assistant county commissioner Dolphine Wanzala addresses parents at Limuru Model Primary School
ADVICE OVER BEATING: Limuru senior assistant county commissioner Dolphine Wanzala addresses parents at Limuru Model Primary School
Image: GEORGE MUGO

The government has urged Kiambu parents to advise their daughters on reproductive health to reduce rising cases of school dropouts.

Limuru senior assistant county commissioner Dolphine Wanzala told parents that advice from teachers was not enough and needed a backup from them. 

Wanzala said cases of pregnancy, especially in secondary school, are on the rise, owing to relationships with married men and others who "want to enjoy themselves with girls".

 

"We get reports of girls dropping out of schools due to unwanted pregnancies. These are issues we can avoid by advising out daughters at home," she said.

"The same advice is extended to schools and our girls will learn to say 'no' to any sexual favours. Our girls are falling into traps of men with money who buy them goodies and give them free rides." 

Wanzala, who represented the deputy county commissioner Charles Mukele, revealed that students are allowed out at night and are at times arrested with other suspects.

MP Peter Mwathi urged parents to follow instructions of the government for the sake of their children's education as well as maintaining the 100 per cent primary to secondary school transition.

"It would be sad for a parent to count losses when their daughters stop schooling because of unwanted pregnancies," Mwathi said.

"It is, therefore, a call to every parent to take up the role of advising their daughters about life." 

Education director Victoria Mulili asked parents and teachers to embrace advice instead of corporal punishment.

 

"When you beat a child, you inflict pain and chances of them repeating what you beat them for is high," she advised.

Edited by R.Wamochie