Living in comfort

Nairobians want safety and wellness, survey shows

Majority of workers in the Nairobi city rank security, safety, and lack of violence as the top reason to stay in or leave their city.

In Summary

• Factors such as career and work opportunities, work satisfaction and pays and bonuses attract and keep people in new cities.

Young people work out in a gym. /FILE
Young people work out in a gym. /FILE

More than half of residents in Nairobi prioritize security and lack of violence to money when switching cities.

A new research by a global consulting leader in advancing health, wealth and career, Mercer shows that 67 per cent of workers in the city rank security, safety, and lack of violence as the top reasons to stay in or leave their city.

Commenting on the role of artificial intelligence in securing economic opportunities and growth, Mercer strategy and geographic expansion leader Pearly Siffel said stakeholders need to rethink the workforce of the future and building a more suitable business environment.

"Technology is important but putting people first will better enable organizations to succeed," Siffel said.

According to Siffel, factors such as career and work opportunities, work satisfaction and pays and bonuses attract and keep people in new cities.

However, businesses must also tailor their solutions, approaches and communications to the individual needs of each group.

The survey showed that white-collar professionals and graduates were interested in career advice, and thrive on interventions such as talent assessments.

The survey also showed that 89 per cent of workers in Nairobi indicated employer-subsidized health and wellness programmes are important to them.

"There is a need to lead multi-stakeholder efforts to address pain points at scale, while promoting transformation," Mercer Principal Consultant Deon de Swardt said.

In the report, Nairobi city was ranked position 14 globally with 41 per cent average performance index in delivering human, health, money and work-related factors. This, among 15 emerging megacities with an average global city index of 62 per cent.

 

Provision of money and work factors by employees outperformed the human and health factors with 42 per cent , 47 per cent 40 per cent and 37 per cent respectively.

The city scored 41 per cent in security, safety and lack of violence out of 56 per cent average global index.

It scored 58 per cent against 71 per cent in access to restaurants, theaters, music and social places.

On health factors, Nairobi scored 37 per cent against 62 per cent in access to childcare and elderly care.

The city was below average in air, water quality and pollution with 29 per cent against 51 per cent.

Performance in total income attained 45 per cent against 65 per cent while the economy of the city scored 49 per cent against 67 per cent.

Transport, traffic and mobility factors scored 35 per cent against 55 per cent while employees’ job satisfaction scores were 39 per cent against 65 per cent.