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Ons Jabeur: Positive attitude will help me get over Wimbledon

Staying positive is definitely the attitude I try to go for. Like Bob Marley sang, ‘Don’t worry, because every little thing is going to be all right!’

In Summary

• As well as my own positivity, I’m very lucky I have a positive team around me — which includes my coach Issam and my husband Karim, who is also my fitness coach.

• They told me: “Remember the first time you lost your first few finals at WTA 250 level and how we thought everything was over? Well then you stepped up and came back stronger — now look at you and where you are.”

Tunisia's Ons Jabeur reacts during her first round match against Poland's Magda Linette
Tunisia's Ons Jabeur reacts during her first round match against Poland's Magda Linette
Image: BBC

Of course, I was really disappointed to lose in my first Grand Slam final but I am a positive person who always tries to look on the bright side — so that will help me to get over losing at Wimbledon.

That’s part of why we play tennis — there has to be one winner and one loser. Unfortunately, I was the loser against Elena Rybakina.

Staying positive is definitely the attitude I try to go for. Like Bob Marley sang, ‘Don’t worry, because every little thing is going to be all right!’

I don’t want to waste what has been a wonderful two weeks at Wimbledon just because I lost in the final. During Wimbledon and the other grass-court tournaments, I know I have improved a lot of things.

As well as my own positivity, I’m very lucky I have a positive team around me — which includes my coach Issam and my husband Karim, who is also my fitness coach.

Shortly after I lost the final, I saw my husband at the gym and we hugged. That’s when I started crying. Then my coach came in too and they both kept talking positively to me about what I had achieved.

After all, I had been in the final of Wimbledon and they told me: “This not a small thing — this is a huge moment.”

They told me: “Remember the first time you lost your first few finals at WTA 250 level and how we thought everything was over? Well then you stepped up and came back stronger — now look at you and where you are.”

It was a really positive talk from them and it made me feel much better — and better about myself.

I think their encouragement made me feel really positive and that’s why I was quite happy when I was talking to the journalists in the press conference.

I would have cried in front of the journalists if Issam and Karim had not talked to me first. Crying is not something to be ashamed of and I prefer to let it out than keep it inside.

I have cried after other matches in the past, especially the ones where losing really hurts. I am a sensitive person and I’m into emotional things. Sometimes I cry a little bit and sometimes I cry like a river.

But I’m very positive about what is going to happen in the future. I always believed I could win a Grand Slam and being surrounded by Serena Williams, who picked me to play doubles at Eastbourne, gave me added belief that I could go far at Wimbledon.

This is the first step of so many other steps — I truly believe that — and playing this final will definitely give me more confidence to go forward.

Earlier in the grass-court season, I put a photo of the Wimbledon trophy on the lock screen of my phone.

Like I said in a previous column, I really love Wimbledon and when I reached the quarter-finals here last year it made me want to really focus on doing well here this year.

Since the beginning of the year, I’ve been really focused on it. So, to inspire myself even more, I put the trophy picture on my phone just before I played in Berlin. I’m not sure if it is going to become a superstition - because it didn’t work! If I had won, I would put every single trophy I want to win on there.

Now I need to take it off. I am going to put a photo of my niece back on instead and look at some cuteness now.

Perhaps I should have put the runners-up prize on my phone instead and then I might have won the other one! But the runners-up trophy is very beautiful and I can’t wait until I can put it in my home.

I have a small trophy area where I keep all my prizes and I won’t be giving this one to my parents, this one will be kept with me for sure.

I keep all my trophies and I still have my trophies from the tournaments I played when I was seven or eight.

There is a closet where I have them and it is a really nice feeling when I open it up and remember the memories.

The Wimbledon prize will be put in a very special place. That’s so I can look at it every time I pass by and remember what a great memory it has been reaching the final.

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