Close

Rookies impress

Coach Opoloto banks on Omuse and Sang to revive the country's men's volleyball

Nason Bwesigye attributed Uganda's rise to patience.

In Summary

• Uganda’s second finish, however, took many by surprise amid questions over the sudden rise.

• Kenya's match against Egypt put Omuse in the limelight as he rose to the occasion impressive with his powerful spikes.

Kenya players react in their match against Egypt during the Al Africa Games qualifiers at Kasarani
volleyball Kenya players react in their match against Egypt during the Al Africa Games qualifiers at Kasarani
Image: Eric Barasa

National coach Moses Epoloto has cited new players Kelvin Omuse and Linus Sang as the future of the men’s volleyball despite failing to book a slot to the All Africa Games set for August in Morocco,

The two made their debut in the national team during the just ended AAG qualifiers in Nairobi with Egypt booking the sole slot to the Rabat event. Epoloto said the two players rose to the occasion and were excellent in their delivery whenever their services were needed.

But it was during the final match against Egypt on Wednesday that put Omuse on the limelight as the Equity Bank player rested the well-travelled Michael Chemos and lived up to expectations with his powerful spikes.

 

Omuse alongside other reserves including Bonfentry Mukekhe, Sammy Ngeny and Kelvin Kipkosgei who were given chance to play in the second set surprisingly went on to take the set although it was not enough to win the match against the Pharaohs 3-1.

Epoloto said: “Generally this is a good squad with an average age of 24  and you can imagine if they are exposed to many international events. However, I must say that Omuse and Sang impressed whenever they got a chance to play and they are definitely destined for greatness.”

He added: “The truth is we need sponsorship if we are top shape up this team. We have a road map for this team and we can’t achieve this if we don’t have sponsors. I believe if we get the necessary support, we can perform at the same level or even better than our women counterparts.”

Uganda, who have been the region’s punching bag in recent times finished second in the four-nation tournament with four points while Rwanda, coached by Kenyan Paul Bitok were third with three points. Hosts Kenya placed last with two points.

Uganda’s second finish, however, took many by surprise amid questions over the sudden rise. However, coach Nason Bwesigye attributed the rise to patience.

“We have been patient. We are not in the business of assembling a team in the last minute and breaking it. We scout players in schools, especially those with good height and although it has taken long for us to prosper, we are finally getting there,” said Bwesigye.

He added: “Again having players turn professional has been an added advantage and it’s just a matter of time before we become a force to reckon. But we will have to better our setting department.”