FROM COURTS

Magistrate discovers preaching passion while working from home

Some rogue clerks, lawyers and prosecutors are getting it rough with Covid-19 outbreak

In Summary

• Court Corridors will soon tell you more about her newfound passion after speaking to her about the same.

Supreme Court
Supreme Court
Image: FILE

What are you doing while staying or working from home? Well, a magistrate has become a preacher and is preaching the gospel through Facebook.

Besides working from home — Chief Justice says the Judiciary is still keeping the wheels of justice running during this pandemic — the magistrate is encouraging citizens through social media. 

Court Corridors will soon tell you more about her newfound passion after speaking to her about the same.

 

Some rogue clerks, lawyers and prosecutors are getting it rough as the Star mole has established.

They are not "harvesting" as they were doing before the coronavirus pandemic hit the country. Initially, some broker lawyers would attend hearings and once they observe the suspect, reach out to their family and friends to get the job. Things are now different.

A lawyer known as 'the court owner’ is finding it rough as she can barely secure a client, despite showing up in court on a daily basis.  There literally no suspects.

The Star mole has also learned that a certain prosecutor and a court clerk who were plea bargaining brokers are also not doing well as court sessions have been suspended.


“You don’t have the authority to deny me entry into the court premises. Whom do you think you are?" a middle-aged man shouted when he confronted some security guards at a Nairobi court.

 

This was after he was denied entry.

The man had visited the court on Monday morning.

“There are no court sessions, just go back home and wait for further directions,” the guard ordered him.

The offended man later left and disappeared.

A mole spoke to the Star that the lawyer is now making frequent calls to the suspect on the name of greeting them.