SAVING MAU

Save Mau Forest, don't politicise evictions

Kenya's biggest water tower will become a desert if settlement continues

In Summary

• Without trees to absorb carbon dioxide emissions and roots to hold soil and moisture, Rift Valley becomes a desert.

•Politicising conservation and restoration of the forest should not be allowed by the government..

Mau Forest.
Mau Forest.
Image: FILE

Forty-one MPs and three governors from Rift Valley have threatened President Uhuru Kenyatta with legal action "if the government continues to force our people" out of the Mau forest.

The threat by the leaders is selfish, misguided and unacceptable considering Mau forest is Kenya's biggest water tower.

The Maasai Mau is the most-threatened of the 22 blocks in the complex covering 46,278 hectares. Some of the threats in the block include human encroachment, tree felling and poor agricultural practices.

Like most forests, Mau has numerous ecosystem benefits including soil erosion control, carbon sequestration, microclimate regulation and providing a habitat for

Without trees to absorb carbon dioxide emissions and roots to hold soil and moisture, Rift Valley becomes a desert. The effects of habitat destruction include a loss of species and resources. Rivers in the region dry up just as the mighty Mara River is drying up. Some species like birds and animals will disappear.

Politicising conservation and restoration of the forest —  to win votes of settlers to be evicted must not be allowed by the government.

Environment Cabinet Secretary Keriako Tobiko has launched the planting of 0 million trees. He should supported by all Kenyans including Rift Valley politicians for their own good and the future of the country.