KILLING THE INDUSTRY

Bad gospel songs due to pride, awards — Wahome

Veteran says current generation 'think they know everything'

In Summary

• The purpose of young gospel musicians is to 'entertain and not serve God'

Esther Wahome
Esther Wahome

Gospel singer Esther Wahome says pride and shallow awards are to blame for the bad gospel songs in our current generation.

Speaking to Word Is, Wahome said during her time, they raised gospel singers who made good music but the generation that came after does not listen for guidance.

"I don't blame them because the current generation is very proud," she said.

 

"I got an opportunity to mentor Emmy Kosgei and it was different because you can see they listened and they are doing good music, zero pride and now we meet abroad, performing there."

Wahome also blames the gospel awarding system. She says the system should award personalities and not a song.

"Gospel awards should award a wholesome being who has done well and not artistes whose songs we are not sure if they are gospel or what message they are carrying or if the person believes in gospel," she said.

She says it feels bad to see the industry they worked so hard to get on its feet being taken for granted by young gospel musicians whose purpose is to entertain and not serve God. She encourages Kenyans to stick to good gospel songs from serious musicians like Mercy Masika.

"She releases good songs now and then but people do not want to listen to good gospel music, they want to listen and talk about the nasty gospel music," she said. Asked if she interacts with the young gospel artistes, Wahome said she does but not on a level of mentorship.

"This breed thinks they know everything and that they know better than anybody. That attitude of they know everything is what keeps some of us away from them because you wonder five years in the industry, what do they know?" she said.

"That is ignorance and they should know that outside Kenya, there are so many opportunities waiting for serious artistes to explore.

 

"None of them is known out there. They are not even known beyond Uganda but they believe they are so huge and they can't be told anything, so the interaction with them is not beyond friendship." 

Her advice is the better you know God the better music you produce. There is a whole big opportunity out there and if you are true to yourself and out there, you will only be respected for what you do and who you are.

 

"When you do a hit song in Kenya, it's just a drop in the ocean and so if you are content with that, you will live with that and another person will come and you will be outdated in the following year," she said.

"But if you are great and true to your call and work hard for the right reason there is a whole world out there waiting for you.

"Let them not be lied to that they are the best. It's never that serious since people have done great things before you."