HEALTH AND NUTRITION

Eating vegetables alone 'won't protect against heart disease'

Biobank sample relating to questions about their daily average consumption of uncooked versus cooked vegetables.

In Summary

•Biobank sample relating to questions about their daily average consumption of uncooked versus cooked vegetables.

As part of a large study conducted by scientists from the University of Oxford, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the University of Bristol, the team analyzed the responses of over 399,000 participants in the U.K.

Biobank sample relating to questions about their daily average consumption of uncooked versus cooked vegetables.

They controlled for a wide range of factors, including socioeconomic status, physical activity, and other dietary factors.

Accordingly, they reported that higher consumption of cooked or uncooked vegetables is unlikely to affect the risk of developing heart disease.

"This is a very interesting study -- but not one that should be used as a justification to stop eating vegetables," Kuhnle said."The best advice we can give people is to focus on their whole diet, what foods to emphasize as well as what to minimize," Lichtenstein said.

"In general, I think the data still supports beneficial effects of a dietary pattern rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, fish, fat-free and low fat dairy and relatively low in added sugar and salt."

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