In Summary
  • JKF boss David Mwaniki said the Ministry of Education should proceed with speed and implement the plan because it seems to have been forgotten.
  •  CAS Ruto said it's time the ministry reconsidered the idea of centralisation of scholarships.

Education CAS Sarah Ruto on Monday said the government will reconsider the idea of making the Jomo Kenyatta Foundation a regulator of scholarships in Kenya.

CAS Education Sarah Ruto presents a cheque to Rilwan Maalim who was accompanied by her parent Safia Maalim and Jomo Kenyatta Foundation managing director David Mwaniki on Monday May 23, 2022
CAS Education Sarah Ruto presents a cheque to Rilwan Maalim who was accompanied by her parent Safia Maalim and Jomo Kenyatta Foundation managing director David Mwaniki on Monday May 23, 2022
Image: WILFRED NYANGARESI

The Jomo Kenyatta Foundation has revisited the proposal to be made the regulator of scholarships countrywide.

The proposal was first made public in 2018.

JKF boss David Mwaniki said the Ministry of Education should proceed with speed and implement the plan because it seems to have been forgotten.

Mwaniki revisited the proposal at a ceremony at JKF offices in which 148 students got Sh22.2 million scholarships.

The recipients all scored 350 and above marks in KCPE exam. Mwaniki said level of need, region and gender was a factor in the selection.

“I want to appeal to Education Chief Administrative Secretary Sara Ruto to step in and fast-track the process because as JKF we are ready,” Mwaniki said.

If this proposal sails through, JKF will regulate, coordinate and manage organisations handing out scholarships.

All intending to provide scholarships to needy children will have to be regulated by JKF.

A report by the Ministry of Education identifies the need to coordinate scholarships.

“The lack of coordination predisposes the processes to manipulation and occasionally leads to duplication of efforts,” the report reads.

This, the ministry clarified, will also ensure most beneficiaries of scholarships are needy students.

 CAS Ruto said it's time the ministry reconsidered the idea of centralisation of scholarships.

“Definitely that’s something that I will follow up because it’s a conversation that really should have happened yesterday,” Ruto said.

She promised to reinvent the proposal, which she said seems to have been forgotten.

“The need is there, and it is a good opportunity when you are diversifying and with your experience we know that surely there’s something that you can offer,” the CAS said.

JKF started offering scholarships in 1968 and has so far benefited more than 11,000 students, spending up to Sh500 million.

The foundation is sponsoring 490 ongoing students in secondary schools.

Edited by A.N

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