ERRONEOUS BILLING SYSTEM

CALVINE OREDI: Kenya power is terrorising customers with monopoly

More misery and torture is meted out on them

In Summary

• Even with the introduction of higher tariffs, one cannot explain when customers get bills as high as over Sh50,000 for one month for single-phase users.

• It is high time, Parliament re-looked at the monopoly status of KPLC that seems to breed arrogance, inefficiency and blatant inflation of customer bills.

The Kenya power symbol
The Kenya power symbol
Image: FILE

Most Kenyans are suffering from the blatant “terrorism” of Kenya Power abusing their monopoly in the supply of electricity.

It is indeed unfortunate that with the economic hardships currently experienced by a majority of Kenyans, more misery and torture is meted out on them through erroneous and fraudulent billing system of Kenya Power.

It is high time Kenyans emancipated themselves from the yoke of Kenya Power exploitation, frequent power blackouts and third rate transformers that collapse when rattled by lightning when it rains.

For instance, when it drizzles in Luanda, we forget about electricity for weeks since the substandard transformers cannot withstand rain droplets.

Customers with metres read by KPLC have suffered the slapping of huge exorbitant bills which are unexplained.

Even with the introduction of higher tariffs, one cannot explain when customers get bills as high as over Sh50,000 for one month for single-phase users.

It is high time, Parliament re-looked at the monopoly status of KPLC that seems to breed arrogance, inefficiency and blatant inflation of customer bills.

I call upon our MPS to stop “sleeping and bickering” in Parliament when citizens are being suffocated with all manner of economic strangulation and push for opening up of the sector.

I particularly call upon my area (Luanda) MP Chris Omulele to spearhead a bill in Parliament to liberalise the power supply in the country so that Kenyans stop suffering.

The competition will improve service delivery.

For instance, if the telecommunication sector would not have been liberalised, we would still be struggling with long queues in telephone booths.

 

Edited by Kiilu Damaris