CONTENTIOUS FORMULA

Revenue sharing standoff mirrors our lack of unity

Challenges such as terrorism show us that we rise and fall as one people

In Summary

• Leaders are mocking and have ganged up to significantly abate resources meant to develop historically marginalised ASAL areas. 

• The resource circus has also clearly brought to the surface how some places still feel they are more entitled to development resources than others. 

A watering hole in Mandera town. Northeastern counties set to lose cash if proposed revenue sharing formula is adopted.
MARGINALISED: A watering hole in Mandera town. Northeastern counties set to lose cash if proposed revenue sharing formula is adopted.
Image: AGATHA NGOTHO

The post- 2010 governance era was supposed to epochally usher in a new dawn of vibrant national unity, equity and humanisation with an aim of healing our scarred and jaded status quo ante and forge us ahead into a bright future.

But in spite of the fact that the appropriate structures and institutions have been progressively set up for achieving this magnificent transformation, there is still a big challenge in terms of culturalisation to the new dispensational order.

We see numerous manifestations of cultural countercurrents like the unremitting extrajudicial killings in the country in addition to the rampant plundering of public resources and standoffish tribal supremacy battles in politics at the expense of the national welfare and interests.

The current debate on revenue allocation formula has also ingloriously revealed that we need to urgently work on national unity and make sure that every Kenyan feels so at home and catered for. 

I never thought, for example, that in post-2010 governance epoch, I would see leaders mock and gang up to significantly abate resources meant to develop historically marginalised ASAL areas that still have a long way to cover in order to emerge from the yolk of poverty and past discriminations impinged on them by the selective resource distribution formulae of the leaders of the past years.

The resource circus has also clearly brought to the surface how some places still feel they are more entitled to development resources than others in an attitude that painfully mirrors our past historical tragedy and impairment as a nation which the new legal order sorted to correct since past and new challenges such as terrorism have taught us that we rise and fall as one people and one nation.

This cultural stagnancy is evidently not healthy for our country and would cost us big in the future if we don't rein it in. So, let's own it as a collective responsibility and fully activate the moral and operational framework espoused in the 2010 Constitution and its relevant laws.

Garissa