COVID-19 EFFECTS

Virus has brought out alternative ways of service delivery

Directive to close businesses, stay home has prompted alternative ways to make money

In Summary

• Scaling down of services does not mean curtailing service delivery. 

• These alternative ways of service can positively be seen as opportunities for opening new frontiers in public service which obviously has not been tapped to its best. 

A drone delivers food.
ALTERNATIVE: A drone delivers food.
Image: COURTESY/ THE HUSTLE

The laudable measures put up by the multi-agency team – the National Response Committee – in dealing with coronavirus in the country are only effective if everyone else in the country makes an effort to protect themselves and others.

The measures highlighted may wane if utmost self-responsibility and behaviour are not cross-examined to align with direction.

It is noteworthy that institutions have established their own means to support the fight against the virus. A host of organisations has scaled down their operations, limited physical access to services, provided necessary utilities such as hand sanitisers at service points and allowed some of their staff to work from home among others.

They have also undertaken sensitisation for staff members on the measures given which has gone a long way in breaking down the stipulations given to all cadres. This has been through multimedia content tactics that unpack in detail every sense to ease the understanding of the directives.

The team is doing a laudable job but which will only be effective if citizens adhere to the directives issued to tame the virus. 

Scaling down of services does not mean curtailing service delivery. With that expectation, the terrifying season has also brought to the fore the ability of some institutions to creatively deliver essential services.

Embracing technological advancements has come a long way in bridging the gap where most entities – including public ones – are reaching out and serving their clientele from a distance.

Their respective stakeholders including the public are too, progressively embracing the new shift introduced during this season. These alternative ways of service can positively be seen as opportunities for opening new frontiers in public service which obviously has not been tapped to its best. 

It is important for public institutions to carefully take stock of their trends of service in such a time and re-introduce or review models sustainable in varied circumstances of dynamic customer needs and aspirations. 

This invites a closer look at the strategic intent of most institutions that should encompass wider and modern-time strategies. Instrumental to the public institutions is the invitation to re-look at the available equipment and technologies so such situations as the current one are dealt with proactively. 

This should entail a corresponding capacity building for staff – even those working from the comfort of their homes – to utilise such shifts and also build necessary team synergy illustrative in uninterrupted service. 

 

Nairobi