WORLD WILDLIFE DAY

Growth of human numbers piling pressure on wildlife

Endangered species increasingly finding themselves on wanted lists of poachers

In Summary

• Human borders have become so real making us think that land, water, air and other living organisms fall within the limits of our designated jurisdictions. 

• Kenya boasts of diversity in wildlife including the Big Five; which are now in danger of diminishing or moving to more friendly environments. 

Wildebeests cross the Mara River.
THREATENED BY HUMANS: Wildebeests cross the Mara River.
Image: FILE

The global community marked World Wildlife Day on Tuesday, March 3. 

Kenya boasts of diversity in species of wildlife including its Big Five – lion, rhinoceros, elephant, buffalo and leopard. But this diversity of animals faces unprecedented challenges of pressure from humankind.

A few decades ago, the rhinoceros were numbered in tens of thousands but today in Masai Mara, they're fewer. The leopards, cheetahs and chimpanzees that once flourished across large parts of Africa are currently confined to tiny areas in parks, reserves and private game farms. 

Human borders have become so real making us think that land, water, air and other living organisms fall within the limits of our designated jurisdictions for administration purposes.

The biological needs influence the distribution of living things themselves since nature conforms with other rules and nothing illustrates the insignificance of our human-created boundaries better than wildebeests and shorebirds.

The highest birth rate in Africa, especially in Kenya – hence increase in population – has put huge pressure on wildlife. Habitats are becoming smaller by the day and endangered species are finding themselves on the wanted lists on poachers.

At the end of the day, we will have to learn to appreciate the relevance of wildlife to our lives and let animals live freely in their natural habitats. 

 

Nairobi