WE HAVE DEMOCRACY

We will get a better nation by ending graft, not revolting

We cannot compare ourselves to Sudan, which is fighting to have just a part of the democracy we are taking for granted

In Summary

• Constitution needs amendments to enhance the system and relieve economic burden. 

• Negative ethnicity, corruption biggest vices dragging us down. 

Sudanese demonstrators chant slogans during a protest demanding Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir to step down in Khartoum on April 6
WE ARE DEMOCRATIC: Sudanese demonstrators chant slogans during a protest demanding Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir to step down in Khartoum on April 6
Image: REUTERS

It is only the politically naive and ignorant few who harbour imaginations of a revolution happening in Kenya just because something of the sort happened in Sudan.

What would be the theme or justification of a violent uprising? What would be the nationally uniting grievance? Is the fact that an uprising dethroned a long-standing dictatorship in Khartoum enough to make Kenyans overthrow the constitutional order, disrupt democratic institutions and collapse the civil bureaucracy?

Kenya has one of the most modern constitutions in Africa. Kenyans have a chance to elect and change the entire political leadership every five years. The canopy of our democracy has its trunk and roots deeply grounded on people’s sovereign will.

 
 

The Constitution declares that all sovereign power belongs to the people. The sunshine of rights and freedoms under the 2010 Constitution can only be compared to the levels of liberty in the Western world.

The people of Sudan are fighting to attain even 5 per cent of the democratic political situation we take for granted here. Politically speaking, Kenya and Sudan are worlds apart. Emulating their uprising is like a university graduate shredding a degree certificate and going back to Standard 3 just because a pupil in lower primary has moulded a beautiful clay pot.

We need amendments to the Constitution that should relieve the economic burden on the citizenry and enhance systems of accountability. Not the nonsense and selfish agitation about expanding the executive or changing the system of government.

Negative ethnicity and corruption are eating at our growth. Dealing with them calls for strengthening of relevant institutions, not emotions about a nebulous revolution.

Nairobi