FAR AND FORGOTTEN NORTH

Cattle rustling rising cause of poverty, reminder of lives lost

Improve road networks to make it easier for security forces to reach the affected

In Summary

•Banditry no longer about cultural practices. 

•Constant attacks leave communities poor and in grief. 

Some displaced Tugen people in Baringo South subcounty owing to banditry attacks
REVIVE THE NORTH: Some displaced Tugen people in Baringo South subcounty owing to banditry attacks
Image: JOSEPH KANGOGO

The inability of the government to contain the increase in banditry attacks in the north ought to be a matter of concern.

Inspector General of police Hillary Mutyambai has termed cattle rustling as the most impending challenge that needs to be combated using all methods available. Traditional narratives for banditry are outdated and misplaced. It’s no longer for cultural purposes.

The recent attacks across the northern region are a painful reminder of lives lost. Poor roads and unreliable network connectivity have been a challenge timely response by security forces. 

The conversation on ending cattle rustling must move closer to the people to arrest the issues of insecurity and banditry and allow the affected communities to redeem their image.

 

Governance and political analyst