BAD PRECEDENT

Opposition attacks on Ruto personal, meant to divide

Raila allies attacking DP because they know he is a stone throw away from top seat

In Summary

• Are nursing their frustrations on Ruto him

• Kenyatta should defend his deputy from state's new-found allies

Deputy President William Ruto and NASA leader Raila Odinga at a past event
BITTER ANTAGONISTS: Deputy President William Ruto and NASA leader Raila Odinga at a past event
Image: FILE

The continuous attacks by politicians allied to ODM leader Raila Odinga and some close to President Uhuru Kenyatta; like Maina Kamanda and David Murathe, on Deputy President William Ruto on matters of leadership and development are unwarranted. The pro-Odinga legislators now seem to be enjoying the close relationship with President Kenyatta after their political deity Raila entered into a unity pact with him (Uhuru).

This is despite the fact that details of the pact remain scanty to date.  Senator James Orengo, Cotu boss Francis Atwoli and their ilk should stop nursing their frustration on Ruto as none is playing his league. It is unfortunate that someone like Atwoli is yet to come to terms with the fact that Ruto is just a stone throw away from the country’s top seat and deserves respect from all Kenyans.

These leaders should not expect that their lies, slander, malice and calumny on the DP will raise any of their political statuses. It is annoying that Atwoli and Orengo have resorted to using abusive language, setting a bad political precedent as if they are above the law. They should also stop blaming ODM’s political misfortunes on Ruto. Those in the Opposition should be made to understand that they have always thrived on corruption and kept their supporters poor in order to remain relevant in politics.

Leaders should engage in issue-based politics and not tribal affiliations that divide Kenyans. Those who offer themselves for re-election will be evaluated against the record of what they have realised. Hence, Orengo and his colleagues in the Opposition should emulate Musalia Mudavadi and engage in constructive criticism instead of personalising issues for their selfish gains.

Political commentator