POLICIES

Political competition should be issue-based

The aspirants should tell voters what they stand for

In Summary
  • Ruto has said he will reverse some of the decisions his boss, President Kenyatta, made while the two were running the government together.

  • ODM leader Raila has outlined his plans to revive the jua kali (informal) sector, among other reforms.

Composite image of Azimio-OKA presidential flagbearer Raila Odinga and Kenya Kwanza's William Ruto.
Composite image of Azimio-OKA presidential flagbearer Raila Odinga and Kenya Kwanza's William Ruto.
Image: BRIAN ORUTA

The road to State House is long, expensive and exhausting. Becoming a candidate of a major party or coalition is only the beginning of the election process. Successful candidates must persuade voters that they deserve their individual votes.

The best way is for those running for the highest office in the land to discuss policy issues and how their proposals will make the lives of Kenyans better.

Deputy President William Ruto has said he will reverse some of the decisions his boss, President Uhuru Kenyatta, made while the two were running the government together.

ODM leader Raila Odinga has outlined his plans to revive the jua kali (informal) sector, among other reforms.

Raila and Ruto are leading the two major coalitions in the August 9 election and their decision to make the campaign issue-based is welcome and should be encouraged.

The thousands of aspirants running for elective offices should emulate their leaders. They should tell voters what they stand for and what policies they will put in place if elected. Political competition should be issue-based.

Quote of the Day: “So never lose an opportunity of urging a practical beginning, however small, for it is wonderful how often in such matters the mustard-seed germinates and roots itself.” 

Florence Nightingale

The British nurse and founder of modern nursing was born on May 12, 1820