FARE THEE WELL

EDITORIAL: Kibaki served Kenya well

Leaders must leave countries better than they found it

In Summary

• Kenya's GDP grew from a low 0.6 per cent in 2002 to three per cent in 2003, 4.9 per cent in 2004, 5.8 per cent in 2005, six per cent in 2006 and seven per cent in 2007.

• This, however, took a dent in 2008, when it slowed to 1.8 per cent mainly because of the impact of the disputed 2007 elections, before growing to 2.8 per cent in 2009

An officer hanging a portrait of the third Commander-in-Chief Mwai Kibaki on April 25, 2022.
An officer hanging a portrait of the third Commander-in-Chief Mwai Kibaki on April 25, 2022.
Image: EZEKIEL AMING'A

Kenya's third President Mwai Kibaki is being buried this Saturday at his Othaya home.

Leadership determines a country's trajectory and Kibaki's presidency, though not devoid of some blemishes, generally propelled Kenya along the right path.

He believed in delegated but accountable leadership, which gave his Cabinet a free hand to make decisions but equally ensure the back stopped with them.

Kenya's GDP grew from a low 0.6 per cent in 2002 to three per cent in 2003, 4.9 per cent in 2004, 5.8 per cent in 2005, six per cent in 2006 and seven per cent in 2007.

This, however, took a dent in 2008, when it slowed to 1.8 per cent mainly because of the impact of the disputed 2007 elections, before growing to 2.8 per cent in 2009 and five per cent in 2010.

His pet project, the free primary education, saw nearly 1.7 million more pupils enrol in school by the end of 2004.

Kibaki's administration also saw revenue collection triple from Sh200 billion in 2002 to Sh600 billion before his exit.

He killed the culture of handouts, which had taken root in the previous regime and encouraged Kenyans to work.

Overall, Kibaki meant well for Kenya, but unfortunately the capture by some selfish individuals put some blemishes in his regime.

Fare thee well Emilio Stanley Mwai Kibaki. You played your part.