LEADER

EDITORIAL- Politicians' bravado fueling ethnic animosity

True, politics is about competition but this can be done devoid of whipping up tribal and sectarian emotions

In Summary

• The four are the main propagators of ethnic animosity through remarks and actions whose unbridled use is just the fuel that is needed to ignite an already tense situation.

• Anyone who was in Kenya ahead of the 2007 elections can easily see the symptoms that plunged the country into the post-election violence but it seems we never learn from history.

Politicians' loose tongues, social media, vernacular radio stations and the so-called "deep state" are likely to set Kenya ablaze as we head towards the 2022 elections.

The four are the main propagators of ethnic animosity through remarks and actions whose unbridled use is just the fuel that is needed to ignite an already tense situation.

Anyone who was in Kenya ahead of the 2007 elections can easily see the symptoms that plunged the country into the post-election violence but it seems we never learn from history.

True, politics is about competition but this can be done devoid of whipping up tribal and sectarian emotions as is now the case. 

When politicians take to the stage and incite you against you neighbour or another tribe, they are simply conducting their affairs in public but for private again.

What Kenyans forget is that unemployment, poor healthcare, poor roads, insecurity and many more have not been caused by their neighbour or the other tribe but leaders who have failed to deliver on their promises.

Transitional polls in Kenya have often proved to be highly charged but as a country, we should be able to go through this without picking a weapon against each other.

As Indian lawyer and anti-colonial nationalist Mahatma Gandhi said,"In a gentle manner, you can shake the world."

Let Kenya prove to the world in the coming elections that our democracy has grown  from "flee and flare" to free and fair.