STRAINED RELATIONS

UK, Kenya must not politicise Covid-19 war

In Summary
  • Unctad 2019 data shows that Kenya's exports to the UK were $391.7 million while Kenya imported goods worth $317.4 million in the same year
  • Kenya and the UK need each other and a middle ground must be found
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, January 21, 2020.
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta at 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, January 21, 2020.
Image: REUTERS

Covid-19 is a global problem and each country is fighting it the best way it can to protect its citizens.

The new variant currently ravaging many countries has led to increased deaths and hospitalisations.

On Friday the United Kingdom, in a bid to contain the spread, added Kenya to its Red List saying the new vaccine-resistant variant is now predominant in Kenya.

Stung and feeling betrayed, Kenya on Saturday hit back introducing similar measures.

Kenya banned passenger flights originating from or transiting through UK airports starting April 9. The suspension will be reviewed in a month.

Cargo flights are however exempted but crew must have Covid-19 vaccination certificates and negative PCR test certificates.

Kenyans in the UK or transiting through British airports are exempt.

Passengers from the UK must produce negative Covid-19 certificates and valid Covid vaccine certification and go through mandatory seven-day isolation after arrival.

The UK ban and the subsequent tit-for-tat by Kenya have a great impact on tourism, business, travel and the security treaties between the two nations.

Unctad 2019 data shows that Kenya's exports to the UK were $391.7 million while Kenya imported goods worth $317.4 million in the same year.

Kenya and the UK need each other and a middle ground must be found.