LEADER

Kenyans must keep off political violence

We condemn the chaos that greeted Deputy President William Ruto's trip to Kenol, Murang'a.

In Summary

• When elections are over, Kenyans go into a lull. They get along with their neighbours and even, to some extent, regret their foolish actions.

• However, immediately the madness kicks in, they gather in tribal cocoons foaming with rage ready to kill their neighbour after some empty headed and mendacious politician orders them to go crazy.

AIPCA Church in Kenol on October 4, 2020
AIPCA Church in Kenol on October 4, 2020
Image: ALICE WAITHERA

American author John Steinbeck said war is a symptom of man's failure as a thinking animal.

This quote aptly describes the trap Kenyans walk themselves into every election cycle with their eyes wide open.

When elections are over, Kenyans go into a lull. They get along with their neighbours and even, to some extent, regret their foolish actions.

 

However, immediately the madness kicks in, they gather in tribal cocoons foaming with rage ready to kill their neighbour after some empty headed and mendacious politician orders them to go crazy.

Kenyans forget that neighbour or friend from a different community whom they loathe is one who will dash to their aid in the event of financial or health trouble. The fondly remembered 'Save a Life' campaign to feed Turkana people is one of the shining examples.

Any time a politician is in trouble, they shove aside their differences and stand with each other.

Kenyans must smell the coffee and wake up from their deep slumber.

Politicians are the best of friends but will spare no chance to antagonise gullible community members to shed blood, if it is in their interest. No politician hacks a fellow politicians to death.

It is in light of the foregoing that we condemn the chaos that greeted Deputy President William Ruto's trip to Kenol, Murang'a.

We call upon the police to rein in political violence because the situation could only get worse with the tense 2022 elections looming.