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PUT AFFAIRS IN ORDER

Write wills to minimise property wars

Most Kenyans believe that writing a will is inviting a bad omen, calling for early death.

In Summary
  • With a will you determine how your estate should be distributed and who should take care of your minor children.
  • It also speeds up the probate process.
Making a will resolves all these issues. You specify exactly how you want your estate distributed, however small or large it is.
Making a will resolves all these issues. You specify exactly how you want your estate distributed, however small or large it is.
Image: EVERPLANS

Property wars are on the rise, especially among prominent families upon the death of the patriarch.

The property battles play out for long in court and at times the protagonists take matters into their own hands, leading to death.

All this can be pre-empted if the family head writes a will. This is a legal document containing instructions as to what should be done with one's money and property after one's death.

 
 

With a will you determine how your estate should be distributed and who should take care of your minor children. It also speeds up the probate process.

The will can be reviewed from time to time when one is still alive to bring it up to date with the wishes of the testator.

Court battles are not only time consuming but property wars equally attract handsome legal fees which eat into the deceased's estate.

Most Kenyans believe that writing a will is inviting a bad omen and calling for early death.

But which is better, putting your house in order while still alive or having your family form part of juicy newspaper stories as they battle for your property?

Since no one knows about tomorrow, let Kenyans adopt the culture of writing wills.

Quote of the Day: If two wrongs don't make a right, try three.

 

Laurence J Peter

The Canadian author (Peter Principle) was born on September 16,  1919.