Fight against Covid-19 losing steam

In Summary

• The initial measures of wearing a mask, washing hands, social distancing, testing, contact tracing, quarantine and isolation are no longer being strictly observed.

• The impact of the pandemic on the economy and the personal lives of Kenyans has been too devastating to allow for a second major wave to sweep across the country.

A Health official takes samples for free Covid-19 testing from a resident who turned up at Garissa Primary School on Sunday, August 23.
COVID TESTING: A Health official takes samples for free Covid-19 testing from a resident who turned up at Garissa Primary School on Sunday, August 23.
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

The government and the public's initial enthusiasm in fighting the spread of Covid-19 was high, but this seems to be ebbing.

The initial measures of wearing a mask, washing hands, social distancing, testing, contact tracing, quarantine and isolation are no longer being strictly observed.

The decline in the number of daily reported cases seems to be giving both the government and the public a false sense of hope that the curve is indeed flattening.

The emerging cases of alleged corruption in the procurement of essential Covid-19 supplies has also made the public lose confidence in the fight, seeing it as a conduit to enrich individuals.

Investigations on the matter must be expedited and action taken against those involved.

Life is back to normal all over the country, with all caution thrown to the wind.

Globally it has been proven that letting down the guard in the fight against Covid-19 has led to a repeated upsurge in the number of new infections.

The WHO, in a cautionary note, warned Kenya that the apparent decline in new cases cannot be taken as an outright indication of a flattening of the Covid-19 curve.

It said additional data and further in-depth analyses are required to verify the reported decline since mid-August.

While it is important for Kenyans to resume eking out a living, it must not be lost on the government and the public that a Covid-19 vaccine is still not available.

The government must ramp up tests, especially among high-risk groups, the washing of hands/sanitising, observing social distance and wearing of masks in social places must be sustained.

The impact of the pandemic on the economy and the personal lives of Kenyans has been too devastating to allow for a second major wave to sweep across the country.