BUSINESS UNUSUAL

Discipline key in Covid-19 containment

Kenyans tempting fate by ignoring health regulations

In Summary
  • It calls for self-responsibility for Kenyans to resume their normal lives and get the economy back on its feet. 
  • Kenyans must adopt and enforce civilian policing to ensure those flouting regulations do not sabotage the war on Covid-19.

The world is reeling from the social and economic effects of the coronavirus pandemic and Kenya is no exception.

Schools and universities remain shut, there is a curfew in place, movement into and out of some counties is restricted, businesses have collapsed while those still operating are staggering.

 

Since the announcement of the first infection in Kenya on March 13, life has not been the same. The country's socio-economic fabric is in tatters and there are no signs we are getting out of the conundrum soon.

 

Health officials had hypothesised that by the end of April there would be 10,000 positive cases. Thankfully the number of those confirmed positive stood at 343 as of Saturday. There have been 14 deaths and 98 recoveries. 

However, it calls for self-responsibility for Kenyans to resume their normal lives and get the economy back on its feet. 

This is not the government's war, it is our war because the longer the restrictions remain in place we are the ones who suffer. 

The police and health officials cannot be present everywhere to enforce the stipulated prevention measures. 

Kenyans must adopt and enforce civilian policing to ensure those flouting regulations do not sabotage the war on Covid-19.

 

Quote of the Day: “Thought without practice is empty; and action without thought is blind.”

 

Kwame Nkrumah

The first Prime Minister of Ghana (1957-60) and first President of Ghana (1960-66) died on April 27, 1972.