CRISIS

Heed locust warning to enhance food security

Kenya should focus on dealing with eggs from the current swarms to tame breeding.

In Summary

• Kenya failed to act on the 2019 warnings by FAO leading to the current crisis experienced almost across the country.

• Due to bad weather conditions, the country is already experiencing lapses in food security which is likely to hype up inflation.

Samburu men attempt to fendoff a swarm of desert locusts flying over grazing land in Lemasulani village ON January 17, 2020.
TOO LITTLE TOO LATE? Samburu men attempt to fendoff a swarm of desert locusts flying over grazing land in Lemasulani village ON January 17, 2020.
Image: REUTERS

Ongoing warnings on the locust invasion indicate that the situation is going to get worse in April.

Over the last couple of months, Kenya has been struggling to tame the locust situation that has ravaged almost half the country.

The locusts have caused damage to crops, with the country facing a looming food crisis with loss of pasture and crops.

 

Kenya failed to act on the 2019 warnings by FAO leading to the current crisis experienced almost across the country.

Due to bad weather conditions, the country is already experiencing lapses in food security, which is likely to hype up inflation.

Economic experts are already warning that due to reliance on agriculture, the Kenyan economy remains vulnerable due to underperformance.

More destruction of crops will not only aggravate food insecurity but will affect the entire Kenyan economy negatively.

As a way forward, the Ministry of Agriculture and all other agencies must focus on destroying the eggs from the current swarms of locusts.

This way, the country will have adequately dealt with the breeding of new swarms thus minimising the damage from the locusts.

 

Quote of the Day: “We don’t need any more promises. We need to start keeping the promises we already made.”

Kofi Annan

The UN secretary general landed in Baghdad on February 20, 1998, for peace negotiations.