BEING REAL

Stop shedding crocodile tears for fallen heroes

Let's celebrate great Kenyans when they are still alive

In Summary

• The gushing tears and condolences for Charles Rubia should have been concrete recognition for his contributions while he was alive.

• While he was alive, few publicly recognised the role he played in breaking the chains of Moi's single-party dictatorship.

The late Charles Rubia
The late Charles Rubia
Image: COURTESY
A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself."
American literature professor Joseph Campbell

The country yesterday buried yet another hero of Kenya's Second Liberation Charles Rubia.

Together with the late Kenneth Matiba, Rubia was detained by former President Daniel arap Moi for their push for multi-partyism.

Upon his death, hundreds of condolence messages poured in from many who just wanted to be seen as part of the group 'mourning' with the family.

 
 

While he was alive, few publicly recognised the role he played in breaking the chains of Moi's single-party dictatorship.

Galant and good deeds in life do not necessarily call for monetary rewards.

Small tokens of appreciation like the naming of roads or schools after such people or giving them state awards while they are alive is much better than condolences they can't appreciate.

State awards in this country have gone to dubious and questionable characters, while great names that have done Kenya proud in academia, medicine, sports, social justice and agriculture fade into oblivion.

In countries that value contributions by individuals, their names are etched in the annals of history for future generations to understand and appreciate their contributions.

The late American literature professor Joseph Campbell sums it up well: "A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself."

 

Quote of the Day: “There are always flowers for those who want to see them.”

Henri Matisse

The French impressionist painter was born on December 31, 1869