Not a good idea for leaders to overstay

In Summary

• When a leader stays in power too long, the transition is always destructive.

•Bashir's fate should encourage our local strongmen to consider whether their prolonged stay in power is best for the country.

Sudan President Omar al Bashir with President Uhuru at Khartoum International Airport
Sudan President Omar al Bashir with President Uhuru at Khartoum International Airport
Image: FILE

The army removed their former colleague President Omar al Bashir palace coup in the Sudan on Thursday. 

The crowds who have been demonstrating for months in Khartoum smell a rat and are refusing to disperse. They know that even the next civilian government is likely to be headed by a newly retired military man.

Bashir's fate should encourage our local strongmen to consider whether their prolonged stay in power is best for the country.

 

When a leader stays in power too long, the transition is always destructive. Look at Libya that is still struggling to recover from the 40-year rule of Colonel Ghadaffi.

President Paul Kagame has certainly stabilised Rwanda in his 19-year rule but what will happen after he leaves? Wouldn't it have been better if the RPF fielded another candidate?

Ditto President Yoweri Museveni. After 33 years in power, is there a risk of him falling like Bashir? Wouldn't it be better for NRM to field a fresh presidential candidate in the next election?

In Kenya, occasionally some voices seek a way for President Uhuru Kenyatta to stay in power. Luckily Uhuru is wiser than that but the fall of Bashir remains a powerful reminder that it is not a good idea.

Quote of the day: "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."

Thomas Jefferson
The third American president was born on 13 April, 1743