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EDITORIAL: Set up police section to rescue kidnapped kids

In Summary

• Police need to do more to fight child kidnapping in Kenya.

• Kenya is the first country in Africa to open a specialist cyber wing to conduct forensic investigations into child pornography. 

Director of Criminal investigations George Kinoti in his office at DCI headquarters during an interview. Photo/Monicah Mwangi
Director of Criminal investigations George Kinoti in his office at DCI headquarters during an interview. Photo/Monicah Mwangi
Image: MONICAH MWANGI

The Director of Criminal Investigations George Kinoti yesterday opened a cyber wing for the Anti-human Trafficking Child Protection Unit (see P8).

The unit will have computers provided by the United Nations to track down indecent images generated by international paedophiles

Kenya is the first country in Africa to open a specialist cyber wing to conduct forensic investigations into child pornography. The wing will be linked to Interpol's International Child Exploitation database.

Child pornography is a problem in Kenya as it is in other countries so it's good that Kinoti is cracking down.

But there are also other forms of child abuse where there is inadequate policing capacity.

In particular, child kidnapping and baby snatching are widespread in Kenya. And there is little the average mwananchi can do if their child is seized by an estranged father or if a baby vanishes from the hospital. The Children's Court has limited resources and the police are often reluctant to get involved in what they consider to be domestic matters.

So Kinoti should go one step further and set up an Anti-Kidnap department in his Child Protection Unit.

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