HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL RELATIONSHIP

Oman and Kenya ties formidable

Sultanate of Oman celebrating 49 years of development.

In Summary
  • Oman is arguably the only country outside the East African countries where the Swahili language is extensively used.
  • The new world order demands more engagement, better cooperation, and stronger interaction among countries.

This year, the Sultanate of Oman celebrates its 49th National Day under the leadership of His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said, with a stronger faith in its firm political principles.

These principles are derived from its civilised values, the aim of which is to build a modern state based on mutual respect between countries, promoting constructive cooperation tools and enhancing common interests for the welfare of the land and people.

With these ideals, the Sultanate of Oman has been able to distinguish itself with a steadfast approach and a positive diplomacy that has earned it the respect and appreciation of the world. As a result it has become a beacon of peace and coexistence, embracing other countries.

Focusing on human as the backbone of development, and in accordance with its sound vision, the Sultanate of Oman directed its efforts to development within. Developing the Omani people has been the government’s objective, in education and capacity building, to enable them take up their role in steering the country’s development.

The Omani woman has been given a significant share of these responsibilities beside her brother. We have five women ministers efficiently participating in strategy development and government policymaking.

The Monarch has dedicated to her October 17 each year as Woman Day.

Our relationship with Africa in general, and the East African region in particular, is not newly born. It is not a relation of immediate economic interests, but an ancient, deep-rooted and robust relationship that derives its strength and stature from family links and the Swahili culture.

From ancient times the name of Oman has been synonymous with sea and maritime navigation. The strategic location of Oman on the Indian Ocean, the Arabian Sea and the Sea of Oman attracts international commercial shipping lines. Its big modern seaports in Salalah, Sohar and the Duqm Economic Zone attract billions of dollars in Direct Foreign Investment.

Most importantly, this location has placed Oman in direct engagement with most parts of the world resulting in various relations. Our relationship with Africa in general, and the East African region in particular, is not newly born. It is not a relation of immediate economic interests, but an ancient, deep-rooted and robust relationship that derives its strength and stature from family links and the Swahili culture.

Oman is arguably the only country outside the East African countries where the Swahili language is extensively used. In Oman we find the Swahili language with its fascinating mix of the original Arabic vocabulary and the Bantu languages reflecting that distinct social and cultural blend between our ancestors.

This unique relationship with East Africa displays itself in the distinctively formidable relationship between the Sultanate of Oman and the Republic of Kenya. The relations between our two friendly countries have evolved over the years beyond historical and cultural ties to involve many others aspects of cooperation. The Sultanate of Oman is keen and determined to take these relations to the highest level for the best interest of the people of the two countries.

The new world order demands more engagement, better cooperation, and stronger interaction among countries on the basis of mutual respect, with the aim of advancing the common interests of their peoples.

Keeping this in mind, the Sultanate of Oman will maintain the wide and steadfast strides that have been made in developing and enhancing the relations with the Republic of Kenya and the wider East African region.

Ambassador of the Sultanate of Oman to Kenya