UHURU LEGACY

Take it from this ant Uhuru, you have to be a leader

He must always act as a statesman, diplomat and gentleman, especially in public.

In Summary

• He cannot force his subordinates to believe in his legacy.

• He should not break the backs of the citizenry trying to achieve it. What will be, will be.

Uhuru, you must be a leader
Uhuru, you must be a leader
Image: STAR ILLUSTRATED

Disclaimer: I don't subscribe to either the so-called Tangatanga or Kieleweke political leanings, both outfits focussed on 2022. Thus, neither of these amorphous entities should be blamed for abandoning the elusive ‘agenda four’ in favour of politics.

I hasten to add that I am among the family of ants that streamed out in 2017 to queue for two days to elect and re-elect President Uhuru Kenyatta, believing he and Deputy President William Ruto were just what the doctor ordered for our political and economic well-being.

In 2012, my family and I were passionate about Kenyatta’s election believing this would keep ‘our own’ away from the ICC. My underage son still hangs a portrait of the younger Kenyatta in his room.

That, however, is history and the present is that President Uhuru has a duty of showing Kenyans what he can do for them, something that has not been so visible. However, his major worry appears to be what he will have done for us, after 10 years as head of state, head of government and commander in chief of the armed forces. That will be his legacy and he cannot force his subordinates to believe in it. He should not break the backs of the citizenry trying to achieve it. What will be, will be.

 

That most Kenyans have realised the ‘big four’ has come a cropper and have started looking elsewhere for answers to their problems should not infuriate Uhuru to the extent of ranting and hurling insults in public and during a solemn prayer session.

Let me respectfully disabuse him of his contention that it was he who influenced the election of most Central leaders in 2017. The electorate has come of age and we elected leaders of our choice.

The President must cultivate the eminence of the presidency and always act as a statesman, diplomat and gentleman, especially in public. He should not resort to the language we heard during the Akorino prayers. What example is he setting for heads of families and our sons, the soon to be heads of families?

Let me respectfully disabuse him of his contention that it was he who influenced the election of most Central leaders in 2017. The electorate has come of age and we elected leaders of our choice, though sometimes we erred. Most leaders were elected on their own merits as opposed to 2013 when the ICC threat influenced choices. Some of these politicians used their resources to campaign for Uhuru, especially during the repeat presidential poll.

Some argue he was addressing his anger at the Tangatanga group, but the Kieleweke group has been doing the same politicking and its members, therefore, have no justification to gloat. The President should have been equally furious when ODM leaders publicly called upon him to endorse Raila for 2022. The two groups are all campaigning prematurely.

When the President tells MPs to go work in their constituencies, what does he really mean? Is he referring to CDF projects? Have all monies for these projects been disbursed? During the 2017 campaigns, the President and his deputy went around promising development.

If the National Assembly has okayed these projects and money is available, the Executive should be executing and launching them. Who's to blame when this doesn't happen? And why does the President become furious when MPs from Central ask him about promises and stalled projects?

Whenever the President comes to Central, he appears irritated and calls people names, which is not very polite to the ‘ants’ that woke up twice at midnight to vote for him. When he hurls insults at elected leaders there, he also disrespects the electorate, as we chose these people as our leaders.

The Jubilee Party has only had two parliamentary group meetings since the 2017 polls and it’s time the President called one to iron out the issues bringing his house down, instead of washing dirty linen in public.

If not, party structures should take care of errant members, if that is the problem. This should end the political noise and divert the energies of elected leaders towards the development agenda. Mr President, lead from the front.