Men's mental health: Kenyans share their perspectives

June is Men's Mental Health Awareness Month.

In Summary
  • According to The National Institute of Mental Health, conditions are more common among women than men, but this may be because men aren’t opening up and reaching out.

Mental health is a vital part of our overall well-being. It encompasses our emotional, psychological, and social well-being, affecting how we think, feel, and act. Good mental health helps us cope with the stresses of life, work productively, and make meaningful contributions to our communities.

Image: COURTESY

Mental health is a vital part of our overall well-being.

It encompasses our emotional, psychological, and social well-being, affecting how we think, feel, and act.

Good mental health helps us cope with the stresses of life, work productively, and make meaningful contributions to our communities.

June is Men's Mental Health Awareness Month.

According to The National Institute of Mental Health, conditions are more common among women than men, but this may be because men aren’t opening up and reaching out.

The Star Kenya sought comments from Kenyans on the same.

"Having or acknowledging a mental health condition is still seen as a sign of weakness or lack of masculinity among some men," Leyden Mutwiri says.

“According to me, I think when men get to share whatever they are going through most of the people assume that whatever they are going through might be because of using drugs," George Musyoki said.

“I think men are not getting enough support from society because most of them don’t get to open up, unlike women who share what they are going through and get first help,” Caroline Wawira.

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