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Conflict pushing food prices up in South Sudan - UN

The prices have increased by 17% compared to last month with the capital, Juba, being the most affected.

In Summary

• The prices have increased by 17% compared to last month with the capital, Juba, being the most affected.

• Some 7.7 million people, more than half of the country’ population, are estimated to be severely food insecure this year.

South Sudan rebels travel in a truck in a rebel-controlled territory in Jonglei State, January 31, 2014. /
South Sudan rebels travel in a truck in a rebel-controlled territory in Jonglei State, January 31, 2014. /
Image: REUTERS

Conflict and disease outbreaks are pushing food prices up in South Sudan, according to the UN office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (Ocha).

The prices have increased by 17% compared to last month with the capital, Juba, being the most affected.

In a statement, the UN also blamed food insecurity for "deepening people’s humanitarian needs” in the country.

Some 7.7 million people, more than half of the country’ population, are estimated to be severely food insecure this year.

They include 87,000 people who are already facing catastrophic conditions, according to Ocha.

On Tuesday, the World Food Programme (WFP) said it was cutting food aid to almost 6.2 million people in South Sudan due to shortages of funds.

Among those to be affected by the food cuts are 178,000 children school under WFP's feeding programme. But it says the effect will be across the country, meaning it will have a severe nation-wide impact.

While global attention is focused on Ukraine, South Sudan continues to grapple with unprecedented levels of food insecurity caused by conflict, climate change, Covid-19 pandemic and the rising cost of living.

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