HEALTH AND LIFESTYLE

Spain to approve a three day workplace menstrual leave

It will join Zambia, Japan, South Korea, and Indonesia where menstrual leave is offered nationally.

In Summary

•Those in marginalized areas will receive the towels free of charge if the bill is passed.

•It will join Zambia, Japan, South Korea, and Indonesia where menstrual leave is offered nationally.

A woman experiencing menstrual cramps
A woman experiencing menstrual cramps
Image: yogajournal.com

Spain is set to be the first country in Europe to offer ‘menstrual leave’.

It will join Zambia, Japan, South Korea, and Indonesia where menstrual leave is offered nationally.

According to the Telegraph, the progressive measure is part of a reform plan that will guarantee up to three days off of work every month for those who suffer from severe period pain.

The Spanish government announced it would approve the new measures at the next cabinet meeting this coming Tuesday.

In Kenya, menstrual leave is not mandated by most businesses and offices, but there are a small number of private companies that offer the benefit of a ‘sick day’ with varying limitations.

The Spanish policy was proposed for workers who suffer debilitating pain during the periods, rather than those who only have slight discomfort.

Tampons and pads
A BASIC RIGHT: Tampons and pads
Image: COURTESY

About a third of women who menstruate suffer severe pain, the Spanish Gynaecology and Obstetrics Society said, according to The Telegraph. Symptoms include acute abdominal pain, headaches, diarrhea, and fever.

"If someone has an illness with such symptoms a temporary disability is granted, so the same should happen with menstruation. Allowing a woman with a very painful period to stay at home," Angela Rodriguez, the secretary of state for equality, told El Periodico newspaper recently.

The reform bill also includes other measures affecting women’s health.

According to the Telegraph, the reform package will also make sanitary pads and tampons more accessible.

The measure will remove the Value Added Tax (VAT) from the product sales in supermarkets and will require schools to offer sanitary towels to students who need them.

Spain joins Malawi in removing VAT on sanitary towels.

Those in marginalized areas will get to receive the towels free of charge if the bill is passed.

“WATCH: The latest videos from the Star”