CLIMATE CHANGE

Bid to include climate change in school curriculum gathers momentum

The commonwealth countries ratified the introduction of climate change in their curriculum in 2018

In Summary
  • The bid to integrate climate change in school curriculum at all levels has gained momentum, with senate becoming the latest lot to add to the push.
  • The senators are supporting a motion calling for the inclusion of climate education in curriculum from early childhood education to institutions of higher learning
Nominated Senator Abshiro Halake addresses women legislators in Mombasa
GET THIS RIGHT: Nominated Senator Abshiro Halake addresses women legislators in Mombasa
Image: JOHN CHESOLI

The bid to integrate climate change in the school curriculum at all levels has gained momentum, with the Senate becoming the latest lot to add to the push.

The senators are supporting a motion calling for the inclusion of climate education in curriculum from early childhood education to institutions of higher learning.

The motion by nominated Senator Abshiro Halake pushes Council of Governors and the ministry of education to introduce the topic in all schools in the country.

Abshiro argued that introducing the topic will equip all schoolgoing children with necessary knowledge on climate.

“Integrating climate education into the syllabus will assist students in improving their understanding of climate change and acquiring the essential skills to reduce its effects,” she said.

 She also wants teachers and school administrators empowered with necessary information and training skills to teach climate education in schools.

The push comes three years since the commonwealth countries ratified the introduction of climate change in their curriculum to educate ‘present and future generations’ on climate change.

The declaration was made during the 20th commonwealth conference of Education Ministers in Nadi, Fiji in 2018.

In February 2020, Environment PS Chris Kiptoo said it will introduce the topic to the educate learners on impacts of climate change.

“Climate change is the greatest challenge of our time. The economic cost of floods and droughts is estimates to create a long-term liability equivalent to three per cent of the GDP each year,” the PS had said.

In her motion, Abshiro said it was important that both the current and future generations are better equipped to address the problem of climate change.

“This can be accomplished by using appropriate instructional strategies such as integrating climate education into the syllabus to assist students in improving their understanding of climate change and acquiring the essential skills to reduce its effects,” she said.

She added that fighting the impact of climate change requires proper promotion of climate action among the young people.

Integration of the topic, she said, will  help individuals understand and address the impacts of the climate crisis, empower them with the knowledge, skills, values and attitudes needed to act as agents of change, hence protect the environment and take action by crafting community level solutions.

“Climate change is a global nightmare with consequences that are already quite visible, and should be a priority for our education curriculum, in accordance to Article 12 of the Paris Agreement,” she said.

The Paris Agreement espouses the enhancement of climate change education, training, public awareness, public participation and public access to information.