DCI trains 43 cops to curb human trafficking, smuggling of migrants

The officers are expected to enhance the financial investigations capacity of Kenyan investigative agencies.

In Summary

•The DCI boss applauded EU's partnership in the security sector, noting that over 70 officers had benefitted from the high level training in the last five months.

•Kinoti further expressed optimism that the concerted efforts which were being employed to curb the menace would be fruitful, given the knowledge frontline officers were acquiring from such trainings.

DCI director George Kinoti speaking during the training./DCI
DCI director George Kinoti speaking during the training./DCI

The DCI is currently training 43 officers who will disrupt financing of Trafficking in Human Beings and Smuggling of Migrants Criminal Networks.

The officers are expected to enhance the financial investigations capacity of Kenyan investigative agencies.

The select team of 43 officers are drawn from DCI, ODPP and other key players in the security sector and are undertaking a five-day training aimed at sharpening their skills in the field.

The training, whose official opening was spearheaded by Director George Kinoti has been facilitated by the European Union through its Anti Money Laundering and Trafficking of Human Beings project at the Great Rift Valley Lodge, Naivasha.

The officers being trained./DCI
The officers being trained./DCI

The DCI boss applauded EU's partnership in the security sector, noting that over 70 officers had benefitted from the high level training in the last five months.

Kinoti further expressed optimism that the concerted efforts which were being employed to curb the menace would be fruitful, given the knowledge frontline officers were acquiring from such trainings.

"The existence of an elaborate national, regional and international network that finances this vice, coupled with a ready market for victims of human trafficking is the monster we are wrestling. I believe we will knock it out", he said.

Project team leader Col. Frederic Bayard commended the earlier teams that had successfully undertaken the training, saying that they were contributing significantly in the fight against many transnational organized crimes.

A picture with the trained officers./DCI
A picture with the trained officers./DCI

He further pledged EU's continued support to the security agencies, citing the necessity of the partnerships in curbing and investigating cases of human trafficking.

The United Nations early this year on a post-dated February 28th, 2021 through its online platforms issued an alert cautioning the world on Organ trafficking, especially in the Middle East.

Globally, human trafficking is considered the second most organized crime after the gun trade.

It earns traffickers more than drug trafficking, with the trio often going hand in hand.

The levels of human trafficking now being reported in some parts of Kenya as in the rest of the world, coupled with organ trafficking cases is a major organised crime that needs attention.

Cases of people being conned in endless job scams including to the Middle East are rampant, and in addition to the loss of money, the few that make it, end up being forced or duped into getting their body organs removed and sold.

Last month, Interpol detected terrorism , smuggling and drug peddling across Kenyan borders.

Deputy Director Public Prosecutions Dorcas Oduor./DCI
Deputy Director Public Prosecutions Dorcas Oduor./DCI

In an operation coordinated across Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, Interpol said their focus was to boost the ability of frontline officers at air, land and sea border crossings to detect a traveller as a potential terrorist or criminal behaviour.

In the March 19 to 28 operation, the officers found out that seven individuals wanted internationally for crimes including fraud, murder, drug trafficking, armed robbery and financial crimes were detected.

"Kenyan authorities at the Moi International Airport in Mombasa arrested a woman after she was found carrying 5.3 kg of heroin worth Sh13,700,000," Interpol said.

Counter-Terrorism Director Gregory Hinds said the suspect travelled to Kenya via an alleged drug trafficking route from Southern Africa to East Africa.

Hinds said border checks also led to the detection of an individual wanted for alleged links to terrorism, as well as of another individual sought by the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity.