COLLEGIALITY

I'm a peacemaker who'll bring teamwork to Supreme Court - Judge Marete

Says he will bring about collegiality in a personal manner to the apex court.

In Summary

• Emotional intelligence, he said, is what is needed the most because the element of one’s relationship is what will carry the better part of what one does.

• He prides himself on his organizational skills which he plans to sell to the Supreme Court.

Justice David Njagi Marete during his interview for position of Supreme Court Judge before the Judicial Service Commission on May 3, 2021.
Justice David Njagi Marete during his interview for position of Supreme Court Judge before the Judicial Service Commission on May 3, 2021.
Image: CHARLENE MALWA

Judge David Marete who described himself as a peacemaker said he will bring about collegiality in a personal manner to the Supreme Court if appointed to serve there.

Secondly, he will bring on board his exposure of over 40 years of practising law.

He said he is a superb leader.

Emotional intelligence, he said, is what is needed the most because the element of one’s relationship is what will carry the better part of what one does.

Judge Marete is one of the seven shortlisted for the position of  Supreme Court judge and was the second to appear before the Judicial Service Commission panel on Monday.

He noted that one might have a high IQ but if he or she lacks emotional intelligence then the smartness will be of no use to anyone.

He prides himself on his organizational skills which he plans to sell to the Supreme Court.

The judge who during the CJ interviews last month was questioned if he has a mental disability because his disability card indicates so and was confirmed to be fine.

His disability card was corrected to reflect that he did not have any mental condition.

Justice David Njagi Marete arrives for his interview for Supreme Court Judge before the Judicial Service Commission on May 3, 2021.
Justice David Njagi Marete arrives for his interview for Supreme Court Judge before the Judicial Service Commission on May 3, 2021.
Image: CHARLENE MALWA

Though he has always been against increasing the number of Supreme Court judges to nine judges, he has come to realise that it is necessary and it is a sensible proposal.

The Supreme Court, he said, should be improved by two other judges and maybe in future be increased to 11 judges.

The Supreme Court has brought itself out on so many aspects of opinions, case law and so far, he said.

He said that he is in favour of a situation where every judge of the Supreme Court does their own judgement which will, in turn, enrich the intellect.

“We all come out with our respective thinking and society will come up with a way of merging it,” he said.

“There may be areas where the court is called upon to give advisory opinions which is an issue the court can come up in unison.”