MUSLIM HOLIDAY

Monday declared Public Holiday to mark Idd-ul-Fitr

Interior CS Fred Matiang'i gazetted May 25 as a public holiday.

In Summary

• Interior CS Fred Matiang'i in a gazette notice declared May 25 a public holiday in exercise of the powers conferred by section 2 (1) of the Public Holidays Act.

• The festival of Idd-ul-Fitr, the Festival of Fast-breaking, is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan

Muslim faithfuls gather for prayers during Eid-Mubarak celebrations in Mombasa.
Muslim faithfuls gather for prayers during Eid-Mubarak celebrations in Mombasa.
Image: ANDREW KASUKU

The government has declared Monday a public holiday to mark Idd-ul-Fitr.

 

Interior CS Fred Matiang'i in a gazette notice declared May 25 a public holiday in exercise of the powers conferred by section 2 (1) of the Public Holidays Act.

Muslims began observing the holy month of Ramadan on April 23.

The festival of Idd-ul-Fitr, the Festival of Fast-breaking, is an important religious holiday celebrated by Muslims worldwide that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. 

 
 
 

The holiday celebrates the conclusion of the 29 or 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the entire month of Ramadan.

Traditions of Idd-ul-Fitr

'Sawm', which is the practice of fasting during the holy month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam.

Muslims believe that it was during the month of Ramadan that the text of the Qur'an was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad.

Muslims celebrate Idd-ul-Fitr with prayers called "Salat Al Eid" in Arabic.

Interior CS Fred Matiangi
Interior CS Fred Matiangi
Image: FILE

Muslims will gather in mosques or open spaces and offer two units of prayer – called "Rakat".

The prayers are followed by a sermon, in which the imam asks for forgiveness, mercy, and peace for every being across the world.

 

Different Ramadan this year

President Uhuru Kenyatta last month ruled out a curfew extension for Muslims during the month of Ramadan.

The President maintained that just like Christians who were forced to mark Easter celebrations at their homes, Muslims should not expect special treatment during the holy month.

He, however, acknowledged the two events as very important in both Muslims and Christians’ calendars but asked for understanding saying the country is currently faced with unprecedented health challenges.

“Same to what we told Christians during Easter, this year is a special year. Everyone to celebrate at home. Muslims should follow suit and know that this is a special year,” Uhuru said.


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