NO DIGITAL LEARNING IN MWINGI

Poverty cannot allow digital learning, parents tell Magoha

Most of their homes are not connected with electricity and digital devices such as TV sets.

In Summary

• They said digital learning would only benefit students and pupils from rich families leaving the poor out.

• Their appeal to the Education CS is that he should consider poor families in his decisions.

Daniel Mutuku, a form four candidate studies from his home in Mwingi town
NO DIGITAL LEARNING Daniel Mutuku, a form four candidate studies from his home in Mwingi town
Image: LINAH MUSANGI

Parents in Mwingi have differed with a statement issued by Education CS Prof George Magoha that learning in schools was not going to be affected during this period when children are at home due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The CS said digital modes of learning has been availed to them during this period when schools have been closed as a way of combating the spread and stop of the pandemic.

On digital learning, most parents in Mwingi are still wondering how this will be actualized when most families from Kitui county are still suffering from poverty.

 

 Most of their homes are not connected with electricity and digital devices such as TV sets, computers, and smartphones.

Their appeal to the Education CS is that he should consider poor families in his decisions and that if the schools won’t reopen any time soon, postponement of KCPE and KCSE exams should be an option.

Education Cabinet Secretary Prof George Magoha during a consultative meeting with officials of the Kenya Secondary School Heads Association at Jogoo House office, Nairobi. on March 12, 2020.
Education Cabinet Secretary Prof George Magoha during a consultative meeting with officials of the Kenya Secondary School Heads Association at Jogoo House office, Nairobi. on March 12, 2020.
Image: COURTESY

They said digital learning would only benefit students and pupils from rich families leaving the poor out.

Patricia Kanini, a parent who resides at Mwingi town, says that her water vending job has greatly been affected by the pandemic.

She said living in a rental house that is yet to be connected to electricity, education of her class eight daughter has been greatly affected since pupils were sent home.

“It perturbs me how my daughter will catch up with the other candidates who are still studying for their end of year exams while she sits home,” Kanini said.

Daniel Mutuku, a form four candidate said learning at home has never been easy as there are many household chores assigned to children and his parents don’t own any TV set or smartphone which could enable him to pursue digital learning.

 

“I cannot concentrate on my studies here, the house chores are too many and I cannot also access the digital learning programs,” said Mutuku

David Muema, a class seven pupil claims that he has seen many children indulge themselves into harmful behaviours like drug abuse during this period and urged the government to take stern action against those exposing children to the drugs.

David Muema, a standard seven pupil goes to fetch water from the river in Mwingi town
NO DIGITAL LEARNING David Muema, a standard seven pupil goes to fetch water from the river in Mwingi town
Image: LINAH MUSANGI

“The government should formulate a way of ensuring the pupils who cannot access digital programs are also involved in learning activities,” he said.

Rachael Peter another parent from Mwingi has decried idleness among children which have increased their interaction with adults, exposing them to many dangers, some wondering in the streets carelessly.

Rachael said that learning at home hasn’t been easy for pupils from poor backgrounds and urged the Ministry of Education to consider postponing national exams as only children from rich families might be well prepared to undertake the exams.


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