Most Covid-19 patients in Kenya had no symptoms - Ministry report

In the symptomatic cases, fever and Cough were the predominant presenting symptoms.

In Summary

• Of the 225 confirmed cases, 92 cases (41 per cent) presented with symptoms. Fever (55 per cent) and Cough (48 per cent) were predominant presenting symptoms

• Between April 10 and April 14, of the 32 patients who tested positive, 31 had no symptoms related to the Covid-19.

A majority of Covid-19 patients had no symptoms when they tested positive, a situation report by the Ministry of Health shows.

The report dated April 16 shows that 59 per cent of the 225 cases announced by Wednesday were asymptomatic.

"Of the 225 confirmed cases, 92 cases (41 per cent) presented with symptoms. Fever (55 per cent) and Cough (48 per cent) were predominant presenting symptoms," the report notes.

 
 
 

Other key symptoms have included difficulty in breathing (21 per cent), sore throat (17 per cent) and headache (13 per cent).

The report shows that most of the cases with no symptoms were recorded from March 31.

For instance, the data shows that of 28 patients that tested positive on March 31, 21 had no symptoms.

The trend has been similar since then with asymptomatic patients making the larger portion of the positive cases.

Between April 10 and April 14, of the 32 patients who tested positive, 31 had no symptoms related to the Covid-19.

President Uhuru Kenyatta on Thursday announced an additional nine cases bringing the total number of positive patients to 234. 

He also announced that one more person had lost their life bringing the number of fatalities to 11.

The number of those who have recovered remains unchanged at 53 with the active cases now standing at 170.

The report by the Ministry of Health shows that by Wednesday, 128 (57 per cent) of the patients are males and 97 (43 per cent) are females.

The majority (62%) are in the age group of 30-59 years.

The report shows that out of the 225 positive cases by April 15, 140 (62 per cent) were imported cases and 85 cases (38 per cent) were local transmissions.

As of Wednesday, eleven counties had reported cases: Nairobi (163), Mombasa (36), Kilifi (9), Nakuru (2), Kitui (2), Kajiado (2), Kwale (1), Kakamega (1), Mandera (6), Uasin Gishu (1) and Siaya (2).

In Nairobi, 44 of the cases were local transmissions, Mombasa (24), Kilifi (7),  Mandera (6), Siaya (2), Kitui (1) and Nakuru (1).

The report notes the challenges that the government is going through in managing the ongoing crisis.

It notes that there is suboptimal coordination between National Task Force and County Governments.

It also lists the inadequate number of trained and skilled health care workers on case management, IPC and response in the event of a large-scale outbreak.

Another challenge is listed as the lack of adequate essential supplies (personal protective equipment) and life-saving basic equipment in the event of a large-scale outbreak.

On surveillance and laboratory, the report lists suboptimal contact tracing observed at the county level.

It also lists the inadequate number of trained and skilled health care workers available for contact tracing and rapid response in the event of a large-scale outbreak.