THREE-DAY WORKSHOP

Train judges on human trafficking cases, state told

Many judges, magistrates and prosecutors lack training in handling cases

In Summary

•Some 328, 000 cases of human trafficking currently before the courts.

•Justice M'Inoti say successful persecution of the cases will be a boost war on human trafficking

AGA AAP board member Markus Green, Justice Kathurima M’inoti and AGA AAP international advisor John Edozie at Utalii Hotel on November 11, 2019
TRAINING: AGA AAP board member Markus Green, Justice Kathurima M’inoti and AGA AAP international advisor John Edozie at Utalii Hotel on November 11, 2019
Image: EZEKIEL AMING'A

The government has been asked for funds to train judicial officers to clear 328, 000 cases of human trafficking currently before the courts.

Justice Kathurima M'Inoti, Director of Judiciary Training Institute, said successful persecution of the cases will be a boost towards taming human trafficking.  

M'Inoti noted that the Judiciary is facing challenges prosecuting the cases because most judges, magistrates or prosecutors lack proper training in handling such cases.

 

M’Inoti said prosecution of human trafficking cases is difficult because of international links and the many people involved in the trafficking chain.

“As a country, we have several cases both as source and origin of human trafficking and that explains why we are focusing on it. It affects the poor and the vulnerable,” said M’Inoti.

M’Inoti spoke during the opening of a three-day human trafficking and electronic evidence training workshop at the Utalii Hotel in Nairobi on Monday.

More than 50 magistrates attended the training organised by the Attorney General, Africa Alliance Partnership  in collaboration with the Judiciary Training Institute and the British High Commission.

M’Inoti said the training will help equip the magistrates with the necessary knowledge for effective conclusion of the cases.

“This is a follow up to the training we had for our judges in September on cybercrime and electronic evidence. This time we are focusing on magistrates many of whom are involved in trials of offences related to human trafficking,” he said.

AGA AAP board member Markus Green said human trafficking is a multi-billion illegal industry involving sophisticated and well connected individuals.

 

According to Global Slavery Index, about 40 million individuals are currently enslaved in the vice, out of which about 71 per cent are women and children.