TSETSE FLY FIGHTER

Kenyan Scientist Kumar Saini awarded for fight against tsetse flies

“The Gold medal is awarded to Saini for his outstanding contribution towards the control and eradication of tsetse flies"

In Summary

• Tsetse and other biting flies are most attracted to zero-grazing units.

• Saini is currently the chief executive of Pestinix Ltd, an international Pest and Vector Control Specialists’ firm based at Two Rivers Mall, Nairobi.

Dr Saini receiving the award from Barrister Mohammed Abdullahi, the Nigerian Minister for State on behalf of the Chairperson of the African Commission. Also in the picture is Prof Ahmed Elsawalhy Director of the African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) representing the Chairperson of the AU/COURTESY
Dr Saini receiving the award from Barrister Mohammed Abdullahi, the Nigerian Minister for State on behalf of the Chairperson of the African Commission. Also in the picture is Prof Ahmed Elsawalhy Director of the African Union Inter-African Bureau for Animal Resources (AU-IBAR) representing the Chairperson of the AU/COURTESY

Kenyan scientist, Rajinder Kumar Saini, has received an award from the African Union Commission for his exemplary contribution towards fighting the tsetse fly and the disease.

Saini is currently the chief executive of Pestinix Ltd, an international Pest and Vector Control Specialists’ firm based at Two Rivers Mall, Nairobi.

He was awarded last week with the global award which was presented to him by the Nigerian Minister for State Barrister Mohammed Abdullahi on behalf of the Chairperson of the AUC in Abuja, Nigeria.

Saini was also recognised for the innovative, outstanding and meritorious research in pioneering the Tsetse Repellent Technology and demonstrating how it can be used in an integrated way to improve livelihoods of small-scale livestock farmers.

“The Gold medal is awarded to Saini for his outstanding contribution towards the control and eradication of tsetse flies and Trypanosomiasis in Africa for more than three decades. His work also provides a new paradigm for vector control,” said Prof James Wabacha, Secretary of the International Scientific Council for Trypanosomiasis Research and Control ( ISCTRC).

“The AUC also recognises Dr Saini for his outstanding contribution, integrity and a strong commitment to the mission and values of the ISCTRC for more than 35 years," Wabacha added.

Tsetse and other biting flies are most attracted to zero-grazing units. The affected cattle would in the long run experience weight loss leading to low productivity in dairy cows, for instance.

The LPF, which is insecticide-treated acts as a barrier between the pen perimeter and the cattle and the flies that are attracted by the animals’ odour gets trapped once they land on the net and die.

This was during the award ceremony, which took place at the commemoration of the 70th Anniversary and the 35th General Conference of the International Scientific Council for Trypanosomiasis Research and Control (ISCTRC).

He was honoured by the AUC and other 38 countries in the region affected by tsetse flies and human and animal sleeping sickness.