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Poisons board urged to tackle problem of fake drugs

The board had maintained its vigilance in post marketing surveillance of the products in the country to ensure they are safe, efficacious and of good quality

In Summary

•Falsified and substandard medicines are a global health crisis

•Kenyans urged to purchase drugs from safe pharmacies which have been accredited by PPB

The Pharmacy and Poisons Board has been challenged to come up with a national approach to tackle the problem of substandard and falsified medical products in the market.

Speaking during the launch of the Pharmacy and Poisons Board Guidelines in Nairobi yesterday, Health CAS Rashid Aman further called on the board to develop consensus and understanding regarding the challenges faced in stopping the circulation of substandard medicines in the continent.

“While noting that the task ahead is enormous, I direct the board to also develop a platform for exchange and use of information, since efficient and effective communication across stakeholders is indispensable,” the CAS said.

 

He further directed that pharmaceutical industries be given the necessary resources to become competitive in the global market.

“Having transparency and accountability will provide credibility to our industries for global competition and help comply with the global requirements for export.”

The PPB Board member Rogers Atebe acknowledged that falsified and substandard medicines are a global health crisis, spread across an international marketplace hence the need for a collaborative solution.

Atebe noted that the PPB through its secretariat has stepped up its commitment to fight the dangers posed by substandard and falsified medical products along the distribution chain.

“There is a very elaborate medical product registration system established that ensures that only safe, quality and efficacious products are granted market authorization. These drugs are analyzed by laboratories to ensure that they comply with the label claims,” Atebe said.

He called on Kenyans to purchase drugs from safe pharmacies which have been accredited by PPB.

 “For the public to distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate drug sellers is to use the health safety code which is displayed in all registered pharmacies.”

 

He noted the board had maintained its vigilance in post marketing surveillance of the products in the country to ensure they are safe, efficacious and of good quality.

This is done by randomly collecting samples from all over the country and effective analysis done at the National Quality Control Laboratory.

A system of reporting suspected poor quality medicines and suspected adverse drug reactions has also been established and this helps the board monitor the medicines in the country.

“Above all, the online services have increased the level of transparency, traceability of documents and accountability, thus making it easy to track and implement international standards.”