NATION IN CRISIS

Catholic bishops decry corruption, accuse state of failure

Say corruption has got worse and most citizens are undergoing great suffering

In Summary

• Bishops say country is headed in the wrong direction following rampant corruption, political hostility and poor policies.

• Warned the handshake has not resolved political hostilities and bad governance.

Archbishop Martin Kivuva of Mombasa with KCCB chairman Archbishop Philip Anyolo
MESSAGE: Archbishop Martin Kivuva of Mombasa with KCCB chairman Archbishop Philip Anyolo
Image: FILE

The Catholic Church yesterday rejected plans by MPs to increase their allowances and asked Kenyans to unite against exploitation.

The bishops said the country was heading in the wrong direction following rampant corruption, political hostility and poor policies despite the handshake.

“Those we elected are indeed not in touch with wananchi who are deeply suffering. In fact, in some instances, we have seen the MPs scuttle the fight against corruption,” Mombasa Catholic Archbishop Martin Kivuva.

 

“The few stealing are becoming rich and denying other citizens basic needs such us good health education and other public facilities.”

The leaders addressed the media at the Catholic secretariat in Nairobi following recent developments on the country.

They asked parliamentarians to lead in the fight against corruption and unite Kenyans.

The leaders warned that the handshake has not resolved political hostilities and bad governance facing the country.

They said cases of corruption are worsening, denying Kenyans basic public services such as health, education and transport.

“We have also noticed that the arrest and prosecution of the corrupt have gone down, which is very dangerous for the economy,” Kivuva said.

“We also find that people are depressed because of the hardships facing the masses.”

 

The bishops urged Kenyans to reject all forms of corrupt practices. They asked Catholic faithful and Kenyans of good will to be agents of fighting corruption.

Kenyans should never give up in the fight against corruption and should instead promote a culture of honesty, the bishops said.

They expressed concern over the increasing number of youths committing suicide and cases of murder which they blamed on frustration.

“Unless we come back to our senses, the peace and stability we enjoy will be a thing of the past," the clerics said.

"We are becoming a society fueled by greed and love for money and this has also made our country a gambling nation

“We speak for masses and the poor masses are on their own. Many have lost hope and the situation is getting out of hand.”

They said the current leaders are worse than those who have previously served the nation.

The bishops said corruption has reached alarming levels as corrupt people have become immune to fights against the vice.